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Top 10 Love is all year round with number 3


senior dog pomeranian old dog
The look you get when Grigri hears he has a visit at the vet

REGULAR VET VISITS

The gift of good health is one that repays itself time and again. Dogs cannot make appointments themselves, so they depend on us, their guardians and caretakers, to seek regular veterinary care. Wellness visits, with even twice yearly visits, are key as your dog ages. It’s easier to fix a potential problem (and likely less expensive) before it turns into something huge.


Just as with younger dogs, regular trips to the veterinarian are important for keeping senior dogs healthy and comfortable. Taking old dogs to the veterinarian for exams and lab work every six to 12 months and keeping up with flea, tick, heartworm, and intestinal parasite control.


Having your senior dog’s health regularly monitored can lead to early discovery of problems, and early discovery of problems can increase the likelihood of a positive outcome.

Most importantly, dogmoms and dads should remember to care for an elderly dog by giving it the love, attention, and comfort it deserves.


A little patience, understanding, and a gentle hand can go very far with older dogs


How to Find a Good Veterinarian


There are bad apples and rude people who are insensitive in every profession. Veterinary medicine is no different. I have a huge amount of respect for caring veterinarians and specialists, vet techs and all those who assist animals day in and day out: And I know we all have bad days.


You don’t talk down to a client.


You don’t use authority and sarcasm in an attempt to toss your “I know more than you do” weight around.


Finding a good veterinarian with whom you can foster a relationship for you and your dog is worth its weight in golden dog biscuits.


When to Run Away from the Vet’s Office (i.e., find a new vet)


* You feel rushed during appointments;

* He or she isn’t open to discussing your concerns or dismisses your wanting to ask about why your pet needs certain meds, or referring you to a specialist.;

* The vet gets annoyed if you ask questions;

* Isn’t giving your pet a thorough exam;

* Insists you absolutely have to buy the food at the vet’s office and you cannot get it elsewhere;

Obviously, there are more reasons than this, but if you feel dismissed and like your dog isn’t the getting care he or she deserves, and more importantly, needs, run like hell to find a new veterinarian.


And that is what I did when I took Lily to my previous vet, Lily is terrified of people, some dismiss it like she needs to get over it, but her level of terrified runs deep and will never go away.. So when the vet picked her up, she pooped all over her.. she was insulted and mad at my dog.. that is the last time she saw me..



chorkie senior dog under white blanket safe space
Lily in her safe space, under a blanket


How to Find a Good Veterinarian


Luckily I have found the vet of my dreams, a caring woman who not only treats my dogs with the most gentle touch, she also does operations on rescuedogs


Caring veterinarians and veterinary technicians who dedicate themselves to the health of pets while developing an ongoing relationship with the pet parent among the true super heroes of the world.


To find a good veterinarian:


Ask friends and family members who they take their dog to see for veterinary visits. More importantly, ask them how satisfied they are with the services. Do you frequent the dog park? Ask folks there. See where folks take their dogs.


When asking, cover the five W’s:

Who do you take your dog to see for veterinary care?

What do you like about this veterinary practice?

When you take the dog in for a visit, does the take his or her time answering questions?

Where is he or she located?

Why do you like going to this particular vet?



Initial Visit


Call the veterinary office ahead of time and ask questions on the phone. Consider making a visit to the vet’s office for a general visit and before any problems arise. Though a dog has to get accustomed to a new vet and vice versa, this is a good place to start.


Is the person answering the phone helpful? Do not be offended if you are put on hold or asked to hold for an emergency. Smaller practices may do this, and it is normal to hear, “Can you hold or is this an emergency?”


Any relationship takes time to develop. We put the same level of care into choosing a vet that we do in selecting a human physician for ourselves.


First Impressions -On the first visit, take notice of:


* The condition and cleanliness of the clinic:

* The vet’s introduction to you and how he or she handles your pet

* Explain why you are there and be honest: You are looking for a new veterinarian and considering this practice

* Find out office hours, how long the vet has been practicing, if you will be able to see the veterinarian consistently, and if there are after-hours, weekend, and/or emergency hours.

* How long the veterinarian has been practicing and if he or she has any specialties.

* If holistic medicine is important to you, now is the time to address the topic. (i.e., alternative treatment, etc)


One of the questions we recommend asking is, “Why should I bring my pet to your practice?” A caring veterinarian will not be offended and will offer the answer.


For me, personally, there has to be a level of “bedside manners” that put me at ease.


Did you ever have a negative experience with a veterinarian? Do you have a gem of a vet? Let us know by barking back in the comments below


signed,


a 'Senior Dog' mom-O-Holic



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